from Ariane Dreyfu’s poem “Paradise” dedicated to dancer-choreographer Dominique Hervieu:

Dominique Hervieu starts dancing again to explain years of work. We are suddenly silent. No church, no church will ever do it
That dizziness filled with hopeThen she sits back downTime for redness under the eye.

(translated from the French by Elias Simpson and Corinne Noirot)
Read the entire poem here.
AM High-res

from Ariane Dreyfu’s poem “Paradise” dedicated to dancer-choreographer Dominique Hervieu:

Dominique Hervieu starts dancing again to explain years of work. We are suddenly silent. No church, no church will ever do it

That dizziness filled with hope

Then she sits back down
Time for redness under the eye.

(translated from the French by Elias Simpson and Corinne Noirot)

Read the entire poem here.

AM


The prurient nature of so many of these dreams (many of them involve fondling and seduction, and several end in coitus) is curious given that Eros is such a lacuna in Perec’s work. The descriptions of women in these dreams are unlike any I’ve found in Perec’s literature; his gaze is at times overtly masculine, even predatory: “At one point she gets up and unhooks her bra. Her breasts are swollen and purple, spangled with stains, or rather with hematomata from exceptionally voracious suction, prolonged and repeated. I am jealous of the man who did this to her.” Why did he not attempt such writing in other forms? Given his torment over the dissolution of his relationship with Suzanne, why did he never try to process the pain of a broken romance through literature?

Scott Esposito, author of The End of Oulipo?, reviews George Perec’s 124 dreams in La Boutique Obscure (translated from the French by Daniel Levin Becker). Read the rest in Asymptote’s newest issue. 
DM

The prurient nature of so many of these dreams (many of them involve fondling and seduction, and several end in coitus) is curious given that Eros is such a lacuna in Perec’s work. The descriptions of women in these dreams are unlike any I’ve found in Perec’s literature; his gaze is at times overtly masculine, even predatory: “At one point she gets up and unhooks her bra. Her breasts are swollen and purple, spangled with stains, or rather with hematomata from exceptionally voracious suction, prolonged and repeated. I am jealous of the man who did this to her.” Why did he not attempt such writing in other forms? Given his torment over the dissolution of his relationship with Suzanne, why did he never try to process the pain of a broken romance through literature?

Scott Esposito, author of The End of Oulipo?, reviews George Perec’s 124 dreams in La Boutique Obscure (translated from the French by Daniel Levin Becker). Read the rest in Asymptote’s newest issue.

DM

The 2013 Best Translated Book Award Poetry Shortlist has been announced!

Transfer Fat by Aase Berg, translated from the Swedish by Johannes Göransson (Ugly Duckling Press; Sweden)
pH Neutral History by Lidija Dimkovska, translated from the Macedonian by Ljubica Arsovska and Peggy Reid (Copper Canyon Press; Macedonia)
The Invention of Glass by Emmanuel Hocquard, translated from the French by Cole Swensen and Rod Smith (Canarium Books; France)
Wheel with a Single Spoke by Nichita Stanescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter (Archipelago Books; Romania)
Notes on the Mosquito by Xi Chuan, translated from the Chinese by Lucas Klein (New Directions; China)
Almost 1 Book / Almost 1 Life by Elfriede Czurda, translated from the German by Rosmarie Waldrop (Burning Deck; Austria)

Asymptote is proud to have published three poems from Xi Chuan’s Notes on a Mosquito, via the amazing Lucas Klein, as well as other work by translators Cole Swensen and Rosmarie Waldrop. 
Of course, we support all the poets and translators nominated, and are eager to know who wins!
AM

The 2013 Best Translated Book Award Poetry Shortlist has been announced!

Transfer Fat by Aase Berg, translated from the Swedish by Johannes Göransson (Ugly Duckling Press; Sweden)

pH Neutral History by Lidija Dimkovska, translated from the Macedonian by Ljubica Arsovska and Peggy Reid (Copper Canyon Press; Macedonia)

The Invention of Glass by Emmanuel Hocquard, translated from the French by Cole Swensen and Rod Smith (Canarium Books; France)

Wheel with a Single Spoke by Nichita Stanescu, translated from the Romanian by Sean Cotter (Archipelago Books; Romania)

Notes on the Mosquito by Xi Chuan, translated from the Chinese by Lucas Klein (New Directions; China)

Almost 1 Book / Almost 1 Life by Elfriede Czurda, translated from the German by Rosmarie Waldrop (Burning Deck; Austria)

Asymptote is proud to have published three poems from Xi Chuan’s Notes on a Mosquito, via the amazing Lucas Klein, as well as other work by translators Cole Swensen and Rosmarie Waldrop.

Of course, we support all the poets and translators nominated, and are eager to know who wins!

AM

Être Belle (Being beauteous) by Aiden Grennelle
Music by The Spinning Boy
Object photos by Declan Hogan
3D models by 3D Dave

This is a video “translation” of a poem from Ciaran Carson’s In the Light Of (Gallery Press, 2012), which in turn consists of “versions” of Arthur Rimbaud’s Illuminations. More videos here.

AM

Asymptote’s Pushcart Nominations 2012

We are proud to nominate the following pieces for the Pushcart prize:

POETRY

'when you have the benefit of hindsight' by Lutz Seiler
translated from the German by Alexander Booth

'Ghazal' by Bidel Dehlavi
translated from the Persian by Rebecca Gould

NONFICTION

'The Generosity of a Matchstick' by Reif Larsen

'Transparency' by Marek Bieńczyk
translated from the Polish by Benjamin Paloff

'The Mausoleum of Lovers' by Hervé Guibert
translated from the French by Nathanaël

FICTION

'Natura Morta: A Roman Novella' by Josef Winkler
translated from the German by Adrian West

We are grateful to all our wonderful contributors, and to these in particular we offer our congratulations as well.

AM


The Art of Asking Your Boss for A Raise is an attempt at exhausting a loop of conditionals. It is a carefully controlled thought experiment. It is a sitcom that takes place over decades. It’s a “Choose Your Own Adventure” story written by someone who loves modal logic, during which you make no choices of your own and none of your decisions would make a difference anyway. It is repetitive and original; pessimistic and funny; moving and absurd.

Kevin Hyde reviews Georges Perec’s “The Art of Asking Your Boss for a Raise”, translated from the French by David Bellos, at Asymptote.
PC

The Art of Asking Your Boss for A Raise is an attempt at exhausting a loop of conditionals. It is a carefully controlled thought experiment. It is a sitcom that takes place over decades. It’s a “Choose Your Own Adventure” story written by someone who loves modal logic, during which you make no choices of your own and none of your decisions would make a difference anyway. It is repetitive and original; pessimistic and funny; moving and absurd.

Kevin Hyde reviews Georges Perec’s “The Art of Asking Your Boss for a Raise”, translated from the French by David Bellos, at Asymptote.

PC


All you need is some good sun and a tiny hole the size of a pin in order to draw an exact image of the world on the opposite wall, inverted but intact: a singular landscape well-lit, the colors, the shadows, the clouds, the ripples on the water, the flight of birds, all seen under a nicely brilliant sun.

Read a longer excerpt from Suzanne Doppelt’s mesmeric Lazy Suzy, on art, photography and the problems of ‘borrowed light’ at Asymptote.
The images are by Suzanne Doppelt. The translation from French is by Cole Swensen.
PC High-res

All you need is some good sun and a tiny hole the size of a pin in order to draw an exact image of the world on the opposite wall, inverted but intact: a singular landscape well-lit, the colors, the shadows, the clouds, the ripples on the water, the flight of birds, all seen under a nicely brilliant sun.


Read a longer excerpt from Suzanne Doppelt’s mesmeric Lazy Suzy, on art, photography and the problems of ‘borrowed light’ at Asymptote.

The images are by Suzanne Doppelt. The translation from French is by Cole Swensen.

PC

Recommended
On Wooden Tablets: Apronenia Avitia by Pascal Quignard (1984)translated from the French by Bruce XBurning Deck (2001)
Here’s an excerpt:

from CHAPTER TWO (folio 485 recto to folio 490 recto)
XV. Young Men Leaning on Columns
     Young men for the first time feeling the delights of languor.     Young men for the first time in their bodies feeling life-force ebb slowly into the western ocean each day, leaving behind fields of mussels and sandy beaches.     Young men morbidly considering an impulse to do themselves in, because of something just read in Greek, a teacher’s sneer, the face of a Saburian girl. Shoulders against columns, standing there. The vague smell of milk and semen still on them. Their vacant eyes staring. Hair tumbling from the neck, wind from the compluvium sometimes parting it. Their skins shivering.

AM

Recommended

On Wooden Tablets: Apronenia Avitia by Pascal Quignard (1984)
translated from the French by Bruce X
Burning Deck (2001)

Here’s an excerpt:

from CHAPTER TWO (folio 485 recto to folio 490 recto)

XV. Young Men Leaning on Columns

     Young men for the first time feeling the delights of languor.
     Young men for the first time in their bodies feeling life-force ebb slowly into the western ocean each day, leaving behind fields of mussels and sandy beaches.
     Young men morbidly considering an impulse to do themselves in, because of something just read in Greek, a teacher’s sneer, the face of a Saburian girl. Shoulders against columns, standing there. The vague smell of milk and semen still on them. Their vacant eyes staring. Hair tumbling from the neck, wind from the compluvium sometimes parting it. Their skins shivering.

AM